Why does the tendon in my heel hurt?

Do I Have Accessory Navicular Syndrome


Overview
The bones of the foot occasionally develop abnormally in a child and an extra bone called an accessory navicular is present towards the inside of the foot, in front of the ankle. This bone is present in approximately 10% of the general population but not large enough to cause symptoms in the majority of these individuals. The extra bone lump present in childhood How can you get taller in a week? be quite uncomfortable because it rubs on shoes. In addition, the feet associated with the accessory navicular are invariably flat. If the child is active and involved in various athletic activities, this will aggravate the inflammation of the tendon that attaches to the accessory navicular. This tendon is called the posterior tibial tendon and is responsible for maintaining the strength of the arch of the foot. The flat-footedness associated with the accessory navicular usually brings the child for treatment.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
People who have an accessory navicular often are unaware of the condition if it causes no problems. However, some people with this extra bone develop a painful condition known as accessory navicular syndrome when the bone and/or posterior tibial tendon are aggravated. This can result from any of the following. Trauma, as in a foot or ankle sprain. Chronic irritation from shoes or other footwear rubbing against the extra bone. Excessive activity or overuse.

Symptoms
Adolescence is a common time for the symptoms to first appear. This is a time when bones are maturing and cartilage is developing into bone. Sometimes, however, the symptoms do not occur until adulthood. The signs and symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome include a visible bony prominence on the midfoot (the inner side of the foot, just above the arch) Redness and swelling of the bony prominence. Vague pain or throbbing in the midfoot and arch, usually occurring during or after periods of activity.

Diagnosis
Keep in mind there are two different types of accessory navicular bones, which you can distinguish by getting a weightbearing AP X-ray of the foot. Dwight has classified type I as a small, round and discreet accessory bone just proximal to the main navicular bone. Geist described the type II accessory bone, which is closely related to the body of the navicular but separated by an irregular plate of dense fibro-cartilage.

Non Surgical Treatment
A combination of the following non-surgical treatments may be used to relieve the symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome. Immobilizing the foot with a cast or a removable walking boot allows the foot to rest and reduces inflammation. Applying ice to the affected area is an effective way to reduce swelling and inflammation. Wrap a bag of ice with a thin towel and apply for intervals of 15 to 20 minutes. Never put ice directly on the skin. Oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) including aspirin or ibuprofen might be prescribed. Sometimes, a combination of immobilization and oral or injected cortiغير مجاز مي باشدteroid medications may reduce pain and inflammation. Physical therapy may be prescribed to include exercises and treatments that increase muscle strength, decrease inflammation and help prevent the recurrence of symptoms. Custom orthotic devices worn in the shoe provide arch support and may prevent future symptoms from developing. The symptoms of this syndrome may reappear even after successful treatment. If so, non-surgical treatments are often repeated.

Accessory Navicular Syndrome

Surgical Treatment
The original procedure advocated by Kidner involved shelling out of the accessory navicular bone from within the insertional area of the posterior tibial tendon and rerouting this tendon under the navicular bone in hopes of restoring a normal pull of this tendon. When treating younger children, history has shown us that simply shelling out of the accessory navicular bone from within the tendon and remodeling the tuberosity of the navicular bone can give you satisfactory results.
In general, you want to reserve advancement of the posterior tibial tendon for adults or those who have a more significant flatfoot deformity. You may also use this approach after determining that quality custom orthotics are only resulting in a slight decrease of symptoms.

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برچسب: What do you do when your Achilles tendon hurts?، Can you stretch to get taller?، How long do you grow during puberty?،
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Recovery Time After Accessory Navicular Surgery


Overview
For most people with an accessory navicular, the extra bone does not cause any problems and most are unaware of its presence. But certain activities or circumstances may cause the extra bone or the tibialis posterior tendon that contains it to grow irritated. This is called accessory navicular syndrome, and its possible causes include sprains, overuse, or wearing shoes that constantly rub against the bone. Individuals who have a collapsed arch (commonly known as flat feet) may be at greater risk of accessory navicular syndrome, assuming they have the extra bone, because of the added daily trauma placed on the tibialis posterior tendon.

Accessory Navicular

Causes
Let us see the reasons why the tendon or the bone would get aggravated. Ankle or foot sprain, irritation of the bone caused by footwear, overusing the foot, quite common in athletes and dancers. People born with this extra bone are also known develop flat feet which also adds to the strain on the posterior tibial tendon and lead to the syndrome.

Symptoms
The symptoms of accessory navicular syndrome commonly arise during adolescence, when bones are maturing and cartilage fuses into bone. In other instances, symptoms do not appAccessory Navicularear until adulthood. The signs and symptoms include a visible bony prominence on the midfoot the inner side of the foot above the arch. Redness or swelling of the bony prominence. Indistinct pain or throbbing in the midfoot and arch during or after physical activity.

Diagnosis
Your podiatrist will most likely diagnose accessory navicular syndrome by making a visual study of the area, checking whether the shape of your foot and your ability to move it indicate there?s an accessory navicular lurking around. He or she may push on the prominence on your foot to check to see if it hurts, and may ask you to walk around in order to ascertain How long do you grow during puberty? your gait is affected. In order to get a certain diagnosis, your podiatrist will need some way to see the inside of your foot, which will most likely involve getting X-rays, or possibly an MRI or some other scan of your foot?s interior.

Non Surgical Treatment
Excess weight will increase the force on the posterior tibial tendon as it inserts into the accessory navicular and will tend to precipitate or aggravate symptoms. If a patient with a symptomatic accessory navicular is overweight, then losing weight can be very helpful. Even losing 5-10lbs will decrease the amount of force going through the foot with each step by as much as 15-30lbs. This is because the foot acts like a lever serving to magnify the force absorbed by the foot with each step.

Accessory Navicular

Surgical Treatment
If conservative care does not alleviate the problem then surgical intervention should be considered. The most common procedure for this condition is known as the Kidner procedure where a small incision is made over the navicular bone. The accessory navicular is identified and dissected free from the posterior tibial tendon. The posterior tibial tendon is then reattached to the remaining navicular bone.

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برچسب: What do you do for a strained Achilles tendon?، What is limb lengthening surgery?، How did the Achilles tendon get it's name?،
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+ نوشته شده: ۸ شهريور ۱۳۹۶ساعت: ۰۵:۱۰:۱۳ توسط:Harold Aird موضوع: